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Wellness Resources / Health Professionals Recovery Program


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Are you ready to make changes?

Do you feel yourself going down the wrong path? Are you working long hours and feeling burnout?

You can choose the direction you are going and get help with substance use or mental health.

The Division of Occupational and Professional Licenses offers a confidential, non- punitive program. This program was created to assist medical professionals (Doctors, Nurses, Dentists, Pharmacists, etc.) who have or are at risk of developing an addiction. The program’s purpose is to assist professionals and their families to identify substance use disorders that pose a potential threat to their careers and get them the help they need.

If you answered yes to any of the questions above, let us help you preserve your license and get you on the road to recovery. For further information about this program contact Katie Stuart.

Program Manager: Katie Stuart, CIP 

Phone: (208)-577-2489

E-mail: Katie.Stuart@dopl.idaho.gov

The Health Professionals Recovery Program is for licensees with unsafe behaviors resulting from mental and emotional conditions and habitual chemical use, both of which are grounds for formal discipline. However, the Division of Occupational and Professional Licenses believes that licensees who acknowledge that their practice may be impaired as a result of chemical dependence or mental conditions and who are actively engaged in recognized recovery methods and, as a result, do not represent a threat to the public, should be allowed to continue practicing. In order to assure public safety, the Division supports monitoring of these licensees outside of the process of formal disciplinary investigation and action under provisions that assure support of recovery and prevention of relapse.

HPRP offers two tracks to this alternative to disciplinary action program.

Track 1: – Non-Board Referral :

  • The licensee has not come to the attention of the Board for violations of the Practice Act or Rules.
  • The licensee or an agent of the licensee (employer, colleague, family member, etc.) contacts the Health Professionals Recovery Program requesting assistance.
  • The licensee agrees to enter treatment for chemical addiction or mental conditions and signs a contract for monitoring by the program.
  • The licensee is compliant with all conditions of the monitoring contract.
  • The licensee is released from the Program following satisfactory completion.
  • The Licensing Board receives no information about the licensee.

Track 2: – Referral by Licensing Board:

  • A formal complaint has been filed with the licensing board or
  • The licensee has voluntarily surrendered his/her license to the Board and has admitted to a disability relating to alcohol or drug use or emotional or mental conditions.
  • The licensee waives the right to a hearing.
  • The licensee is referred to the Health Professionals Recovery Program and signs a Contract for Monitoring through the program.
  • The licensee agrees to enter treatment.
  • The licensee is compliant with all conditions of the monitoring contract.
  • The licensee is released from the Program following satisfactory completion.
  • There is no record of formal disciplinary action by the licensing Board.

For further information about this Program, contact Southworth Associates at (208) 323-9555, toll-free (800-386-1695), visit Southworth Associates’ website; or you can contact Katie Stuart, Division of Occupational and Professional Licenses– at (208) 577-2489

  1. Keep a copy of your contract handy and refer to it often. Your monitoring contract contains the “dos and don’ts” of HPRP. It is essential that you understand and comply with this contract to remain in good standing within the program, so ask questions if you are unclear about something.
  2. Comply with all requirements outlined in your HPRP contract, as they are specific to you and your recovery.
  3. Submit all required documents on time.
  4. Constantly remind others who submit reports on your behalf about the due dates for the reports.
  5. Inform all appropriate persons about your monitoring. At a minimum this should include:
    1. Family and significant others
    2.  All your healthcare providers, including counselors
    3. Employers: your direct supervisor, monitor, and any others that are directly affected by your monitoring.
  6. If you miss a check-in, you can either self-test or not test and risk having been selected, thus missing a test.
  7. Be aware that consuming large quantities of liquids prior to giving a urine sample can result in a “dilute” urine, this can be viewed as an attempt to hide use. Dilute urines can be viewed, therefore as a positive result.

Q: How long is the program?

A: The Health Professionals Recovery Program believes that 5 years of monitoring is the gold standard. However, adherence to program compliance could affect the length of time.

Q: How much will this cost me?

A: Southworth Associates: $25 monthly administration fee

Support Group $10-$15 per meeting attended.

Drug Testing

$60 per UA

$66-$259 per test, depending on the hair panel

$140 per Peth (Blood)

*Testing frequency will be based on multiple factors*

Q: Is there financial aid?

A: There is no formal financial aid. However, you can work with insurance as well as BPA Health 800.486.4372.

Q: If I’m a self-referral what kind of information is shared with the Board?

A: The Division staff hears on a monthly basis if you are compliant or non-compliant. They do not receive anything about your evaluation or diagnosis.

Q: What is the difference between a self-referral and a Board referral?

A: Self-Referral: The licensee has not come to the attention of the Board for violations of the Practice Act or Rules.

Board- Referral: A formal complaint has been filed with the Board, or the licensee has voluntarily surrendered his/her license to the Board and has admitted to a disability relating to alcohol or drug use or to emotional or mental conditions.

In addition to DOPL’s Health Professional Recovery Program (HPRP), many medical licensees in Idaho also have the option of utilizing the Physician Vitality Program (PVP). PVP was created by Ada County Medical Society in 2016 to address the growing needs of those facing the epidemic of physician burnout, as well as other occupational and personal stressors. The program is currently available to all medically licensed members of the Idaho Medical Association and Idaho Academy of Family Physicians: physicians (including residents), physician assistants, and nurse practitioners. Idaho medical students should seek services provided through their school.

PVP provides five confidential appointments at no cost, with a strong emphasis on maintaining the privacy of individuals seeking help. While many clinicians have access to Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) through their insurance plans, they often hesitate to use them due to genuine or perceived confidentiality concerns. PVP created its own panel of clinically licensed mental health professionals available throughout Idaho and via telehealth and chose those with a reputation for serving medical clinicians. It is suitable for those seeking help for depression, grief, relationship and work challenges, imposter syndrome, and other issues commonly faced by those who practice medicine.

To find out more about this program, visit www.physicianvitality.org.

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